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Pittsburgh Pirates

 
Located in Pittsburg in Pennsylvania, the Pittsburgh Pirates are one of the most popular and successful teams that play for the Central Division of the National League. They have won the World Series Championship five times and have also played first in the modern World Series. They are nicknamed as ‘Bucs’ and ‘Buccos’.
 
History of the Pittsburg Pirates
 
During the later half of the 1870s precisely in 1876, baseball was popularly played in the Pittsburg area. The team called themselves as ‘Pittsburgh Alleghenys.’ According to historical data, the team suffered badly when most of its players joined the ‘Pittsburgh Burghers’ of the Players League in 1890. The Alleghenys had a terrible season that year when they finished the season with 23-113. As an impact of this, owners of the team changed.
 
From 1901 to 1945, the Pirates dominated the center stage of the game in the National League. But, they had a number of injuries. This is the reason why they lost the first ever modern World Series in the year 1903. This set the tone for their defeat and they had their worst season ever. They finished the season with 51-103 in 1917. However, they bounced back in time and recovered from the 3-1 slump to win the World Series in 1925 by defeating the Washington Senators. They also became the finalists of the 1927 World Series, but they eventually lost to the New York Yankees.
 
The period post the World War II (that is from 1946 to 1969) did not yield positive results to the Pittsburgh Pirates. With a string of losses and injuries, the team’s morale had touched the lowest chord. Though they worked hard to reach the World Series, they lost it to the New York Yankees.
 
More recently in 2008, the Pittsburgh Pirates failed yet again to maintain their winning combination. To make matters worse, in order to cope up with financial stringency, the Pirates decreased their payroll and started trading away their key players. This resulted in an irreparable loss to the team.
 
Pittsburgh Pirates 2010 Spring Training roster
 
Pitchers
 
  • 62 Ramón Aguero
  • 37 Charlie Morton
  • 49 Ross Ohlendorf
  • Hayden Penn
  • 63 Ronald Uviedo
  • 45 José Ascanio
  • 25 Kevin Hart
  • 39 Chris Jakubauskas
  • 32 Brad Lincoln
  • 48 Javier López
  • 53 Brendan Donnelly
  • 29 Octavio Dotel
  • 57 Zach Duke
  • 52 Joel Hanrahan
  • 28 Paul Maholm
  • 34 Daniel McCutchen
  • 47 Evan Meek
  • 64 Bryan Morris
  • 56 Donnie Veal 
 
Catchers
 
  • 41 Ryan Doumit
  • 35 Jason Jaramillo
 
Infielders
 
  • 17 Pedro Alvarez
  • 13 Ronny Cedeño
  • 51 Steve Pearce
  • 5 Ramón Vázquez
  • 18 Neil Walker
  • 6 Jeff Clement
  • 2 Bobby Crosby
  • 73 Argenis Díaz 
  • 3 Akinori Iwamura
  • 15 Andy LaRoche
 
Outfielders
 
  • 19 Ryan Church
  • 43 Gorkys Hernández
  • 58 John Raynor
  • 31 José Tábata 
  • 24 Delwyn Young 
  • 16 Brandon Jones
  • 46 Garrett Jones
  • 22 Andrew McCutchen
  • 85 Lastings Milledge
 
Spring Training non-roster invitees
 
  • 77 D. J. Carrasco
  • 70 Jack Taschner
 
Coach/Manager
 
Manager
 
  • 7 John Russell
 
Coaches
 
  • 26 Joe Kerrigan (pitching)
  • 59 Don Long (hitting)
  • 54 Ray Searage (coach)
  • 10 Tony Beasley (third base)
  • 60 Luis Dorante (bullpen)
  • 12 Carlos García (first base)
  • 14 Gary Varsho (bench) 
 
Pittsburgh Pirates Baseball Hall of Fame
 
  • Fred Clarke (Player/Manager, 1900–1915)
  • Roberto Clemente (1955–1972)
  • Pud Galvin (1887–1889, 1891–1892)
  • Jake Beckley (1888–1889, 1891–1896)
  • Jim Bunning (1968–1969)
  • Max Carey (1910–1926)
  • Jack Chesbro (1899–1902)
  • Rich Gossage (1977)
  • Hank Greenberg (1947)
  • Frankie Frisch (Manager, 1940–1946)
  • Ned Hanlon (1889, 1891)
  • Billy Herman (1947)
  • Waite Hoyt (1933–1937)
  • Joe Kelley (1891–1892)
  • Burleigh Grimes (1916–1917, 1928–1929, 1934)
  • Joe Cronin (1926–1927)
  • Kiki Cuyler (1921–1927)
  • Barney Dreyfuss (Owner, 1900–1932)
  • Connie Mack (1894–1896)
  • Heinie Manush (1938–1939)
  • Rabbit Maranville (1921–1924)
  • George Kelly (1917)
  • Ralph Kiner (1946–1953)
  • Chuck Klein (1939)
  • Freddie Lindstrom (1933–1934)
  • Bill McKechnie (1907, 1910–1912, 1918, 1920;
  • Manager, 1922–1926)
  • Al Lopez (1940–1946)
  • Bill Mazeroski (1956–1972)
  • Willie Stargell (1962–1982)
  • Casey Stengel (1918–1919)
  • Pie Traynor (1920–1934; Player/Manager, 1934–1939)
  • Bob Prince (Announcer, 1948–1975)
  • Branch Rickey (Executive, 1950–1955)
  • Billy Southworth (1918–1920)
  • Dazzy Vance (1915)
  • Lloyd Waner (1927–1941, 1944–1945)
  • Paul Waner (1926–1940)
  • Vic Willis (1906–1909)
  • Arky Vaughan (1932–1941)
  • Rube Waddell (1900–1901)
  • Honus Wagner (1900–1917; Manager, 1917) T206 card
 
Ford C. Frick Award recipients
 
  • Milo Hamilton
  • Bob Prince
 
Facts & Figures
 
Win-loss records
 
100 Wins in a Season
 
  • 1902 (103–36), Fred Clarke
  • 1909 (110–42), Fred Clarke
 
100 Losses in a Season
 
  • 1890 (23–113), Guy Hecker
  • 1917 (51–103), Jim Callahan and Honus Wagner
  • 1952 (42–112), Billy Meyer
  • 1953 (50–104), Fred Haney
  • 1954 (53–101), Fred Haney
  • 1985 (57–104), Chuck Tanner
  • 2001 (62–100), Lloyd McClendon
 
Major league titles
 
  • World Series titles (5) 1909, 1925, 1960, 1971, 1979
  • NL Pennants (9) 1901, 1902, 1903, 1909, 1925, 1927, 1960, 1971, 1979 
  • Central Division titles (0) None
  • East Division titles (9) 1970, 1971, 1972, 1974
  • 1975, 1979, 1990, 1991, 1992
  • Wild card berths (0) None
 

  

Last updated on Wed, 05/26/2010 - 14:06.

 
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